Two white University of Arizona students arrested over brutal beating of...

For brutally beating up a fellow student at the University of Arizona for no apparent reason at all, two White students have been arrested...

At just 10 years old, this Nigerian tech genius has been...

While most kids of her age are schooling, Emmanuella Mayaki, a 10-year-old Nigerian girl, has already earned a living working as a teacher at...

Haiti PM Calls For Calm Amid Fuel Shortage

Haiti - News : Zapping...16/09/2019 11:30:58 Fuels : PM Lapin calls for calmJean Michel Lapin, the acting Prime Minister resigned, informs the population that importers have confirmed, the arrival Monday, September 16 of 110,000 barrels of gasoline and 155,000 other barrels of diesel are expected between 19 and 20 September."The talks continue with the different sectors concerned by the fuel market in order to solve this problem definitively to the satisfaction of the population [...] We ask the population to keep calm and not give in to manipulations politicians [...]" See also : https://www.haitilibre.com/en/news-28749-haiti-flash-next-arrival-of-fuels-in-less-quantity-than-political-announcements.htmlEmbassy of Canada, phone problem< b >The Canadian Embassy in Haiti is currently experiencing technical problems. If you need consular assistance, contact us at +1 613 996 8885 (collect where possible) or sos@international.gc.ca.Anti-government demonstrationOn Monday, anti-government protesters erected barricades of burning tires on several major roads in the metropolitan area, including Delmas 30, Bourdon and Couch Vert paralyzing traffic and creating tension in the capital. important police device was deployed to deal with possible violence.Motorcycle taxis paralyze trafficOn Sunday at Bon-Repos (Croix-des-Bouquets), motorcycle taxi drivers paralyzed traffic from the Sol gas station on RN #1.Canada : Travel AdvisoryAfter France https://www.haitilibre.com/en/news-28506-haiti-news-zapping.html , it is the tuen of Canada to issue in a NOTICE to his fellow citizens wishing to travel or reside in Haiti."Haiti is experiencing fuel shortages. The situation has led to instances of violence across the country since September 2, 2019. Protests are expected over the next few days. Burning barricades are already disrupting traffic in the main streets of Port-au-Prince.Avoid all unnecessary travel to Haiti. If you are in the country :- Limit all non-essential movements- Avoid crossing road blockades, even if they appear unattended- Plan to have adequate water, food and fuel suppliesHL/ HaitiLibre

Tennessee Black Man Ends Up Roughed Up, Searched, Jailed After Cops...

When Tennessee police stopped a Black driver and accused him of having too darkly tinted his windows, it ended with the driver handcuffed and thrown in jail. That driver, Timothy Hamilton, filed suit against the Franklin Police Department in late August accusing officers in the Nashville suburb of using excessive force in the September 2018 incident, according to the lawsuit the Tennessean newspaper obtained. Timothy Hamilton has filed a lawsuit against the Franklin Police Department alleging officers used excessive force in arresting him. Cellphone footage shows officers handcuffing him. (Screenshot from Fox 17 video) Hamilton was parked in the parking lot of Green Street Church of God, where he is a member, when officers Nicholas Smith and Tyler Wiggers stopped him to allege his window tint was too dark, Hamilton’s attorney said in the lawsuit. Officers also alleged that before Hamilton parked in the church he had illegally parked in the street while briefly visiting a family member and made an illegal turn, according to the lawsuit. The officers then “grabbed [Hamilton] by his arms and jerked him back and forth,” before slamming him on the hood of his vehicle and arresting him, Hamilton’s attorney said in the lawsuit. Hamilton’s fiancée, Kanesha Vaughn, was detained at the scene while officers waited for a K9 unit to arrive to search Hamilton’s car for drugs, the Tennessean reported.  When the dog arrived, no illegal drugs were found in the vehicle, but officers allegedly seized three cellphones, $1,300 in cash and two sealed packages addressed to Hamilton, which turned out to contain speakers, the Tennessean reported. Hamilton was charged with improperly passing, resisting a stop, halt and frisk; and stopping, standing or parking outside a business or residential district, but the charges were later dismissed, according to the Tennessean. The accused man told Fox affiliate WZTV he believes he was the victim of severe racial profiling and that he knows his windows weren’t too dark. “I work at a luxury car dealership and the people we use, that’s who I used to professionally do my windows,” Hamilton told the news station. “I grew up in this town, and I know that’s what you use to pull people over. I was a Black male in a Black neighborhood, and I was in a nice car.” The man’s attorney, Richard Brooks, told WZTV, “this is not ‘Gone with the Wind'” and he’s trying to change the attitude of cops. “All they had to do was tell him he violated traffic law and give him a ticket and go on, but that wasn’t their purpose, their purpose was to pick on a young man in a fancy car,” Brooks said. “They said he can’t have this fancy car and be Black in Franklin unless he’s a drug dealer.”

Black Tech Founder Details Journey from Extreme Poverty to Closing $1.6...

In the eyes of entrepreneur Abbey Wemimo, there’s nothing he feels he can’t overcome. That’s because he knows what it’s like to have very little, compete with the best and still come out on top. His winning secret, is simply knowing his stuff. “They can rip everything away from you,” the 27-year-old executive said to Atlanta Black Star, “but they can’t rip your mind.” Samir Goel (left) and Abbey Wemimo founded savings and investment apps Esusu and closed a $1.6 million seed round. (Photo by Esusu) He and co-founder Samir Goel started a set of savings and credit building apps dubbed Esusu Savings and Esusu Rent that on August 28 closed a $1.6 million seed round. “With the support of our strategic investors and partners, Esusu is poised for unprecedented growth and ready to scale to serve the millions of Americans struggling to save and create a financial identity,” Wemimo said in an earlier statement. The way Esusu works is by repackaging group savings and rent payments as forms of borrowing that could help improve users’ credit scores. The name itself actually is a Yoruba word used to describe informal savings and credit associations for mutual benefit in traditional African societies. “We create an agreement to save, and that’s seen in the eyes of the law as a debt obligation,” Wemimo explained. Through the app, he and his co-founder work with landlords and renters to record rent payments and savings as debt obligations. “Our system combined over 4,000 regulations to make sure data is accurately reported,” Wemimo said.  He came up with the idea for his app when his family, anchored by a single mom of three, struggled to afford his education. Wemimo, always having been an A student, got into some of the top schools in Lagos, Nigeria, where he’s from. But unlike the children of prominent ministers and doctors he went to school with, Wemimo said his family “had nothing.” “You just come from the slums,” he said, “and you barely have a toilet in your house.” His relatives had to pool their resources to afford his education, and his mother contributed much of the money. “My mother is one of the strongest persons I know,” Wemimo said. “She used 50 percent of her salary to afford my school.” She did it without complaining, and Wemimo applied the same fervent dedication to his schoolwork. That dedication got him into the University of Minnesota Crookston, where Wemimo applied with his sights set on going to an American university. But without the money to pay for the tuition, he said he got a payday loan with a 400 percent interest rate, and, he added, that kind of borrowing is not uncommon. “So this is the struggle of what’s going on in America,” Wemimo said. He ended up graduating cum laude from the Minnesota-Crookston in 2013 and obtaining a full ride to New York University’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, where he later graduated in 2015. That led to a job as an operations risk analyst at Goldman Sachs and another doing mergers and acquisitions at PricewaterhouseCoopers. All along the way, Wemimo said he and Goel were saving to start their own company. The two had met at the Clinton Global Initiative, which convenes leaders from across sectors to solve global problems. They initially planned to partner in another business but changed their aim. “We thought the issue was people needed to save more,” Wemimo said. But after talking to consumers, they learned the real issue was actually accessing credit. “There are 45 million people in the United States without a credit score,” Wemimo said in his statement. “Our platform helps to score them, build their credit profiles and will ultimately unlock over $3.1 trillion in untapped capital.”  He and Goel explained that Esusu simply digitizes one of the oldest forms of savings among immigrants from countries ranging from India to South Africa and European countries, and that time-honored form is pooled savings between families and friends. “Our technology is capturing financial information that has never been recorded to equalize the playing field and increase access to capital and credit for millions that have been underserved by the financial system,” Goel said.

Here’s How Jesse Williams, Scholly Creator Christopher Gray Helped Students Find...

If you watch the business competition show “Shark Tank,” then you might’ve seen Christopher Gray walk into the room and present his app Scholly, which streamlines the process of finding and obtaining scholarships for college. “Scholarships are extremely hard to find,” Gray told the “Shark Tank” judges during the episode. “This causes millions of dollars in free money to go to waste, as many students don’t know this money exists.” Jesse Williams and Christopher Gray share how they helped students score $100 million dollars in scholarships. (Photo by David Crotty/ Patrick McMullan via Getty Images. Christopher Gray Instagram/ @cjgray91 ) Lori Greiner, one of the judges, as well as FUBU co-founder, Daymond John, decided to partner with Gray after a bidding war ensued. They took a 15 percent stake in Scholly for a $20,000 investment. But Gray’s business moves with the app were far from over at that point. Because the actor Jesse Williams saw that 2015 episode and was instantly taken with the young entrepreneur and his app. He then met Gray at a conference, and the two men teamed up. Williams said he personally related to Scholly, because he struggled to pay for college himself. And as a former educator, the app spoke to him on a business level. Today, Scholly not only helps people find scholarships in an easy way, the company is now helping folks pay off their student loans. In fact, Gray said he’s already assisted 13 graduates in paying off loans up to $150,000. “As a student, I struggled in college too,” said Williams in an interview published by BET. “With the stresses of student loans and being able to pay for school every single semester, doing ROTC and holding work-study jobs, I worried that I was gonna have to drop out.” “So it related to me, personally. Then, as a former teacher, I know it was a big issue for my students. So we connected,” he added. During his “Shark Tank” visit, Gray said he created a list of 20,000 different scholarships for the app and sold 92,000 downloads for 99 cents each at that time. These days, Scholly’s user count is in the millions, and Gray explained what else he wants to accomplish with the app. “Right now, we have three million users, and we’ve helped students raise over $100 million in scholarships so far,” he said. “You go through the app and click a button and just start applying for the scholarship instantly.” “My interest and excitement about the product is really about creating a great equalizer,” he added. “Because the barriers around education are entirely tied intrinsically to race and class. So we want to create that connective tissue that allows you to actually just peek into the window and see what your opportunities could be.” Williams then said the app allows users to take control of their future when it comes to higher education, as opposed to waiting for assistance from someone else. “This is really about helping people from working-class families,” Williams stated. “I want to also say that this has everything to do with an ongoing and escalating conversation around the crippling cost of schools and universities, but also black economy and black economics.” “We need to try to get a handle on the steering wheel of our own destiny and think about what we can do without waiting with our hands out for somebody else to solve our problem,” he added. “And this young brother [Gray] has figured out a way to actually tackle our issue ourselves.” For his own studies at Drexel University, Gray told the “Shark Tank” judges that he secured $1.3 million in scholarship money. [embedded content]

John Legend Criticizes Felicity Huffman’s 14-Day Sentence

Michael Kovac/Getty Images for Fred Segal John Legend is weighing in on Felicity Huffman’s surprise 14-day prison sentence for her part in the college admissions bribery scandal. The actress was also ordered by a federal judge to pay a fine of $30,000 as well as perform 250 hours of community service. Many criticized the sentence as an example of how low-income individuals and people of color often receive much higher sentences for lesser transgressions.  “I get why everyone gets mad when rich person X gets a short sentence and poor person of color Y gets a long one,” Legend tweeted without directly naming Huffman. “The answer isn’t for X to get more; it’s for both of them to get less (or even none!!!) We should level down not up.” “Americans have become desensitized to how much we lock people up. Prisons and jails are not the answer to every bad thing everyone does, but we’ve come to use them to address nearly every societal ill,” he continued. Americans have become desensitized to how much we lock people up. Prisons and jails are not the answer to every bad thing everyone does, but we've come to use them to address nearly every societal ill. — John Legend (@johnlegend) September 14, 2019Legend then mentioned some of the cases people cited as examples of inequities in sentencing. “It’s insane we locked a woman up for 5 years for sending her kid to the wrong school district. Literally everyone involved in that decision should be ashamed of themselves,” he tweeted, referencing Connecticut mom Tanya McDowell, who in 2012 was sentenced to five years in prison for enrolling her son in a school district where he didn’t live. It's unconscionable that we locked a woman up for voting when, unbeknownst to her, she was ineligible. — John Legend (@johnlegend) September 14, 2019 And no one in our nation will benefit from the 14 days an actress will serve for cheating in college admissions. We don't need to lock people up for any of this stuff.— John Legend (@johnlegend) September 14, 2019“No one in our nation will benefit from the 14 days an actress will serve for cheating in college admissions.” Share : TOPICS: Celebrity Felicity Huffman John Legend

Investigation Finds Teachers Posing with Noose Was a Crass ‘End-of-Year Joke,’...

It was a poor attempt at an end-of-year “joke” — not racial animus —  that prompted four California elementary school teachers to happily pose for a photo with a noose, district officials who reviewed the matter say. Palmdale activist Najee Ali scoffed at the investigation’s findings however, and has called for further action against the teachers involved. “As far as I’m concerned, this isn’t over with,” Ali told the Antelope Valley Press in a recent interview. The noose photo was included in a mass email to staff sent by Principal Linda Brandt. (FOX 11 / video screenshot) Three Summerwind Elementary School educators remain on leave after the offending photo, snapped by then-principal Linda Brandt, was sent in an e-mail blast to the entire school’s staff before making its way to social media. The image sparked outrage among parents who demanded their firings and even sought to confront the first-grade teachers themselves. “We want (Brandt) out of here. I do personally!” parent Darrin Harper told FOX 11 at the time. “Because I know what she about. The pictures prove it, that’s what she about and that’s what she allow to go on. So she need to go.” Ali was also among those calling for the ousters of Brandt and the unnamed teachers, who reportedly claimed ignorance when pressed about any racial implications of the photo. The activist said he isn’t buying their explanations. “It’s hard for me to believe that out of the four teachers [and] one principal who were investigated, that not one of them understood the horrible, racial implications on what the noose means for African-Americans, historically,” he told the newspaper, calling it “disingenuous” that the group was allowed act as though they were unaware of the history behind the symbol. “I think at the end of the day, we need to have an outside department look into investigating this further to really have the entire truth come out,” he added. Brandt, who was in consideration to lead the Palmdale School District as superintendent, resigned from her post in May, the AV Press reported. The four teachers are still suspended as officials decide how to move forward, now that the investigation is complete. A 36-page report of the inquiry detailed how one of educators found the noose while cleaning out an old classroom that had been used for storage. She then took it to the teacher’s lounge and showed it to former principal Brandt, who joined in repeating their end-of-the-year “hang in there” joke, according to the report. That’s when Brandt took the picture of the four staffers, smiling and posing with the noose, at the suggestion of the teacher who found it. With Brandt’s permission, that teacher then used the principal’s phone to send the photo to all school staff. The email also included a photo of the noose hanging in someone’s office. District officials selected a law firm to investigate the matter, a move Ali compared to “having the fox watch the hen house.” “I’m not surprised at all by the findings,” he told the AV Press, calling the investigation a “whitewash. The local activist is now calling for an independent review by State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond.

Michigan Cop Finally Earns a Spot in the Unemployment Line After...

A Michigan police officer is out of a job following an investigation into racist memorabilia, including a framed Ku Klux Klan application, found inside his home early last month. A Muskegon city manager confirmed the firing of Charles Anderson on Thursday but declined to say more on the matter. However, officials said a redacted copy of the investigation report will be shared with the public in the coming week, according to MLive. Muskegon police officer Charles Anderson was initially placed on leave after a couple touring his home, hoping to buy it, found KKK memorabilia hanging on his bedroom wall. (Photos: WZZM13 video screenshot, Rob Mathis / Facebook) Anderson, a 22-year veteran of the Muskegon Police Department, came under scrutiny in August after an African-American couple on a real estate tour of his home discovered the racist memorabilia. Rob Mathis, who was looking at the home with his wife and kids, said he immediately cut their walk-through short after stumbling upon the “disturbing” document. He later posted about the incident on Facebook, writing: “I’m seeing confederate flags on the walls the dining room table and even the garage. I’m thinking to myself as a joke, ‘I’m walking to the imperial Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan‘s house right now.” To his surprise, when Mathis walked into the main bedroom he found a blank application for the KKK framed and hanging on the wall. “I feel sick to my stomach knowing that I walk to the home of one of the most racist people in Muskegon hiding behind his uniform,” he added. Speaking to Grand Rapids station WZZM 13, the local father expressed relief upon learning of Anderson’s firing and called it “great news for the community.” Anderson was initially placed on leave following the incident, but a month-long inquiry into whether he’d violated city policy ended with his termination this week. Muskegon Police Chief Jeffrey Lewis has remained tight-lipped on his department’s review of the incident, but said investigators found “no smoking gun.”  “Some questions arose that we’d like to have further answered,” Lewis said, according to MLive. “But I can tell you this, after reviewing this — and it was a quite lengthy investigation — what you saw on social media pretty much stands the way it is. There was no smoking gun revealed to us or anything that shocked us.” In 2009, Anderson was cleared of any wrongdoing in the deadly shooting of an unarmed Black man. He reportedly shot in self-defense after the suspect, Julius Johnson, beat Anderson with his own police radio. News of the racist memorabilia sparked calls by activists for prosecutors to give the case another look. Earlier this month, county prosecutor D.J. Hilson said his office was awaiting the results of the city’s inquiry before deciding whether to re-evaluate the deadly shooting.  Although he’s glad Anderson is finally off the force, Rob Mathis said he fears it’ll do little to change what he sees as a culture of officers protecting each other’s bad behavior. “There are other officers within the force that have been to Anderson’s home [and] were well aware of the Confederate flags,” he told MLive. “(Officers who) contributed to that behavior, instead of saying we as a police force are supposed to have good attitudes when making decisions for our community.” “These KKK applications, flags, they’re not indicative of people who should protect and serve our community,” he added. Watch more in the video below.

NCAA Protests California Bill That Would Allow College Athletes to Profit...

A new bill was passed in the California State Assembly on Wednesday, that will make it allowable for college athletes in the state to earn money off their names, images and likenesses. But the bill is getting some major pushback from the NCAA. Senate Bill 206, also referred to as the Fair Pay to Play Act, is now on its way to Gov. Gavin Newsom, and people like LeBron James as well as Draymond Green have gotten behind it. The NCAA is giving push back against a new bill in California that would allow college athletes to earn money off their names, images and likenesses. (Photo: Icon Sportswire/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images Entertainment) “Everyone is California,” tweeted James on Sept. 5. “Call your politicians and tell them to support SB 206! This law is a GAME CHANGER. College athletes can responsibly get paid for what they do and the billions they create.” On its website, the NCAA states that “Student-athletes may not receive any type of pay or compensation for play (either directly or indirectly) and cannot be involved in any commercial endorsements for a product, service or establishment.” So for example, if a player’s jersey with his or her name on it hangs in a store, that person can’t make anything from it — while others are able to profit greatly. According to Sports Illustrated, the NCAA made $1.1 billion in 2017. NCAA President Mark Emmert, as well as 21 of the organization’s board of governors, clearly want to keep the current rules in place. Because they signed a letter that was sent to Newsom on Wednesday and said if the bill becomes law it will erase the line between pro and college athletes. “If the bill becomes law and California’s 58 NCAA schools are compelled to allow an unrestricted name, image and likeness scheme, it would erase the critical distinction between college and professional athletics and because it gives those schools an unfair recruiting advantage, would result in them eventually being unable to compete in NCAA competitions,” read the letter. Sen. Nancy Skinner, who spearheaded the bill, has already responded to the NCAA’s letter and said it’s filled with nothing but desperate, empty threats. “The NCAA has repeatedly lost anti-trust cases in courts throughout the nation,” Skinner said. “As a result, threats are their primary weapon.” If the bill is signed by Newsom it would go into effect on Jan. 1, 2023.

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